Dear Future Novel

Here's hoping for reprints!

65,238 notes

1. Don’t think that being published will make you happy. It will for four weeks, if you are lucky. Then it’s the same old fucking shit.

2. Hemingway was fucking wrong. You shouldn’t write drunk. (See my third novel for details.)

3. Hemingway was also right. ‘The first draft of everything is shit.’

4. Never ask a publisher or agent what they are looking for. The best ones, if they are honest, don’t have a fucking clue, because the best books are the ones that seemingly come from nowhere.

5. In five years time the semi-colon is going to be nothing more than a fucking wink.

6. In five years time every fucking person on Twitter will be a writer.

7. Ignore the fucking snobs. Write that space zombie sex opera. Just give it some fucking soul.

8. If it’s not worth fucking reading, it’s not worth fucking writing. If it doesn’t make people laugh or cry or blow their fucking minds then why bother?

9. Don’t be the next Stephen King or the next Zadie Smith or the next Neil Gaiman or the next Jonathan Safran fucking Foer. Be the next fucking you.

10. Stories are fucking easy. PLOT OF EVERY BOOK EVER: Someone is looking for something. COMMERCIAL VERSION: They find it. LITERARY VERSION: They don’t find it. (That’s fucking it.)

11. No-one knows anything. Especially fucking me. Except:

12. Don’t kill off the fucking dog.

13. Oh, yeah, and lastly: write whatever you fucking want.

Matt Haig, “Some Fucking Writing Tips” (via alcantrez)

(Source: matthaig.com, via authordog)

9,501 notes

Isn’t it odd how much fatter a book gets when you’ve read it several times? As if something were left between the pages every time you read it. Feelings, thoughts, sounds, smells…and then, when you look at the book again many years later, you find yourself there, too, a slightly younger self, slightly different, as if the book had preserved you like a pressed flower…both strange and familiar.
Cornelia Funke, Inkspell (via observando)

(via claybabay)

8,787 notes

amandaonwriting:

The Top 10 Best Opening Lines Of Novels1. Cat’s Eye, Margaret Atwood, 1998“Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space.”2. Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury, 1953“It was a pleasure to burn.”3. Gone With The Wind, Margaret Mitchell, 1936“Scarlett O’Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were.”4. The Gunslinger, Stephen King, 1982“The man in Black fled across the Desert, and the Gunslinger followed.”5. The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien, 1937“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.6. Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov, 1955“Lolita. Light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.”7. Middlesex, Jeffrey Eugenides, 2002“I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974.”8. Peter and Wendy, J. M. Barrie, 1911“All children, except one, grow up.”9. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen, 1813“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”10. Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut, 1969“All this happened, more or less.”
by Meredith Borders via LitReactor

amandaonwriting:

The Top 10 Best Opening Lines Of Novels
1. Cat’s Eye, Margaret Atwood, 1998
“Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space.”
2. Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury, 1953
“It was a pleasure to burn.”
3. Gone With The Wind, Margaret Mitchell, 1936
“Scarlett O’Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were.”
4. The Gunslinger, Stephen King, 1982
“The man in Black fled across the Desert, and the Gunslinger followed.”
5. The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien, 1937
“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.
6. Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov, 1955
“Lolita. Light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.”
7. Middlesex, Jeffrey Eugenides, 2002
“I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974.”
8. Peter and Wendy, J. M. Barrie, 1911
“All children, except one, grow up.”
9. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen, 1813
“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”
10. Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut, 1969
“All this happened, more or less.”

by Meredith Borders via LitReactor

(via theliterarysnob)